Wednesday, April 25, 2012

A Small Pebble


5 comments:

  1. I know Rumpy Dog! I was touched she would love and commemorate pets who did not otherwise have a person. I do believe it cost her dearly emotionally though.

    ReplyDelete
  2. A young woman who has an animal shelter for horses (and dogs and cats) wrote some months ago that she changed her mind about several issues recently. First of all, it is very hard to accept one's own limitations and the limitations of the world instead of wanting to save every animal under all circumstances. She thinks that the most important thing is that animals should have a delightful life, and when it is unavoidable, a quick and easy death. Animals live in the present, they have no plans for the future, they do not dream of running freely on the fields or pissing trees on the backyard in the next years. If the present of an animal is happy then he is all right. A correctly prepared and conducted euthanasia is similar to the preparation for a surgery for a dog: only people know that there is no comeback. Euthanasia is only for human's mind and soul so terrible, but not for the animal. Despite this, euthanasia is by no means good. It is result of human irresponsibility, and answer to a hopeless and awful situation caused by our society. Keeping dogs in narrow, stinking cages, alone, condemned them to detention, madness and slow death is worse.

    Of course, there is a bright (but also touching) side of the work at animal shelters, too. For example, such stories (you won't understand a word from it, but the photos might be capable of telling the essence of the things - just follow the links to further sites with different stages of this story): http://www.zakuszkatanya.hu/blog/read/1155

    ReplyDelete
  3. Aw Kolytyi, you always lend your wisdom and make a sad situation a little bit better. I had never thought of euthanasia as being like anesthesia induction for animals - you are right - we humans bear the burden of grief afterwards. And YES euthanasia is always better than unrelieved suffering.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Becky MeysenburgMay 22, 2013 at 12:29 PM

    When i collected a pebble for each and every euthanasia that i had to perform, i gave me a sense of no life is taken invain, i personally will remember every face, every fluffy coat, every wagging tail as i walked them down to the eithanasia room and prepared them for their final fate. And with that i shared a little piece of myself with them, telling them they will not be forgotten, at least not in my lifetime. I do remember the wonderful times at the shelter, when we rescue animals from a puppy mill or a wounded or abused animal was taken from the abuser or even a scared pup that had been used for a year in a research facility and he was finally letting us pet him after several weeks of love and affection. but in the end, my heart was not prepared for a lifetime of ending lives. As a veterinary technician in a animal hopsital i feel so much more fullfilled in my career.

    ReplyDelete